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Anitra Brown

Are Daily Spa Deals That Good A Deal?

By November 30, 2012

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My in-box overflows with incredible-looking deals every day, but I hardly ever look at them. How come? First, I'm just one of those people who just doesn't like coupons. I don't use them at supermarkets or drug stores (they don't usually have coupons for organic produce and generic aspirins anyway) and the thought of pulling out a coupon in a restaurant or spa makes me squirm.

If I need a low-cost massage, I'd rather go someplace where it's part of the business model, like Massage Envy, or my local massage therapist.

I don't like to buy impulsively. So by the time I notice a Groupon deal I might buy (eyelash extensions for $39?), it's gone.

And I'm busy, so I'm not free for the last-minute spa deals. And when I look, they don't seem like such great deals. Today's deal for 70%-off a mini-Ayurvedic facial was originally $294, so at $88 it's about right for a 45-minute facial at a day spa. Maybe if spas got real about their everyday pricing, they could build a loyal, local clientele and stop with the daily "deals".

"People who use them (and whose numbers are fast-declining) get often-huge discounts from local businesses, but too often don't ever go back to those businesses to pay full price, which is supposed to be the whole idea for offering them," says an article in CNN Money.
Maybe people aren't using the sites anymore because they found out they don't use the deals. A friend of mine threw $300 down the drain on a laser hair removal series she never followed-up on because the location was out of her neighborhood.

All these deals cheapen the work that spa therapists do. I like events like Spa Week and SpaFinder Wellness Week, but when the deals are pouring in every day -- and they're not such great deals -- they're not worth opening the email.

Comments
December 11, 2012 at 11:28 pm
(1) April H, LMT says:

Thank you. Daily deals cheapen the spa’s reputation and make it difficult for them to justify their regular prices. Wellness services are not a commodity.

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